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Sci. STKE, 13 February 2001
Vol. 2001, Issue 69, p. pe1
[DOI: 10.1126/stke.2001.69.pe1]

PERSPECTIVES

Arrestins as Signaling Molecules Involved in Apoptotic Pathways: A Real Eye Opener

William E. Miller and Robert J. Lefkowitz

The authors are at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3821, Durham, NC 27710, USA. E-mail: millerw@receptor-biol.duke.edu and lefko001@receptor-biol.duke.edu

Abstract: Recent data suggest that internalized receptor and arrestin complexes are actively involved in signal transduction. Miller and Lefkowitz discuss evidence from the Drosophila visual system that suggests that intracellular rhodopsin and arrestin2 complexes induce apoptosis. Experiments with activated mammalian G protein-coupled receptor and arrestin complexes point to a mechanism by which proliferative or proapoptotic signals can be mediated largely independent from G protein activation.

Citation: W. E. Miller, R. J. Lefkowitz, Arrestins as Signaling Molecules Involved in Apoptotic Pathways: A Real Eye Opener. Sci. STKE 2001, pe1 (2001).

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