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Sci. STKE, 14 October 2003
Vol. 2003, Issue 204, p. pe43
[DOI: 10.1126/stke.2003.204.pe43]

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Protein Translocation in Photoreceptor Light Adaptation: A Common Theme in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Vision

Vadim Y. Arshavsky*

Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract: How do our eyes adjust to daily light levels that vary by almost 11 orders of magnitude? Research shows that, in both vertebrates and invertebrates, signaling proteins are translocated in a light-dependent manner between the photoreceptor cellular compartments where visual transduction takes place, and the rest of the photoreceptor cell. Protein translocation is likely to contribute to photoreceptor light adaptation by adjusting the sensitivity and speed of photoresponse to ever-changing conditions of ambient illumination.

*Contact information. E-mail, vadim_arshavsky{at}meei.harvard.edu

Citation: V. Y. Arshavsky, Protein Translocation in Photoreceptor Light Adaptation: A Common Theme in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Vision. Sci. STKE 2003, pe43 (2003).

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THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN CITED BY OTHER ARTICLES:
Transduction of Receptor Signals by {beta}-Arrestins.
R. J. Lefkowitz and S. K. Shenoy (2005)
Science 308, 512-517
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