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Sci. STKE, 27 March 2007
Vol. 2007, Issue 379, p. pe11
[DOI: 10.1126/stke.3792007pe11]

PERSPECTIVES

Unconventional Roles of the NADPH Oxidase: Signaling, Ion Homeostasis, and Cell Death

Benjamin E. Steinberg and Sergio Grinstein*

Program in Cell Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada M5G 1X8 and Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8.

Abstract: Although the central role of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase in mediating bacterial killing has long been appreciated, this sophisticated enzyme complex serves various other important functions. This Perspective focuses on these underappreciated roles of phagocytic NADPH oxidase, highlighting recent work implicating reactive oxygen species in triggering an unconventional form of cell death.

*Corresponding author. E-mail: sga{at}sickkids.on.ca

Citation: B. E. Steinberg, S. Grinstein, Unconventional Roles of the NADPH Oxidase: Signaling, Ion Homeostasis, and Cell Death. Sci. STKE 2007, pe11 (2007).

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