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Science 334 (6060): 1219-1220

Copyright © 2011 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Warburg Effect and Redox Balance

Robert B. Hamanaka1, and Navdeep S. Chandel1,2,3

1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
2 Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
3 Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.


Figure 1
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Buffering ROS. PKM2 participates in a negative feedback loop to control cellular redox homeostasis. Increases in cellular ROS promote the oxidation of PKM2, which inactivates its catalytic activity and promotes diversion of glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) into the pentose phosphate pathway. This pathway produces NADPH, which provides reducing equivalents to cellular antioxidants systems, thereby increasing cellular redox buffering capacity.

CREDIT: B. STRAUCH/SCIENCE

 


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