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Animation. Oscillatory Mechanisms Underlying the Drosophila Circadian Clock.

This animation was created by Cameron Slayden for Russell N. Van Gelder and depicts a schematic of the Drosophila circadian clock mechanism in a single pacemaking lateral brain neuron. The time of day is represented by convention as Zeitgeber time (ZT), which is the number of hours elapsed since dawn (ZT 0). The time of day is also represented by the travel of the sun and moon; ZT 6 corresponds to noon, ZT 12 to dusk, and ZT 18 to midnight. Within each cell, clock components are shown in the cytoplasm (black) and nucleus (dark blue). Each gene's coding DNA is color coded as double helical, whereas the transcripts from that gene are shown as green curved lines. The changes in abundance and interactions of many components of the oscillatory mechanism occur simultaneously; for simplicity, we have listed the major activities taking place at each timepoint. The animation accompanying each interaction can be seen individually by clicking on the green arrow. The times shown for all activities are approximate, and may vary from cell to cell within a single organism. To see the animation in continuous motion, click and hold the red double arrows at the bottom of the screen.

R. N. Van Gelder, Drosophila Circadian Pathway. (Connections Map), http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/cm/CMP_13296 [Specific Pathway]

Citation for these animations: R. N. Van Gelder, Animation of Drosophila Circadian Oscillator. Sci. STKE (Supplement to Connections Maps), http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/sigtrans;CMP_13296/DC1.


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Science Signaling. ISSN 1937-9145 (online), 1945-0877 (print). Pre-2008: Science's STKE. ISSN 1525-8882