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Science 300 (5616): 63-65

Copyright © 2003 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Also see the archival list of Science's Compass: Enhanced Perspectives

DEVELOPMENT:
Enhanced: May the Force Be with You

Paul Martin and Susan M. Parkhurst

Much is known about the reorganization of cell layers during embryogenesis, but the actual forces exerted as epithelial sheets bend, fold, and tuck during events such as dorsal closure and gastrulation have not yet been elucidated. In their Perspective, Martin and Parkhurst discuss one of the first examples of a study (Hutson et al.) that seeks to measure the forces exerted in the fruit fly embryo during dorsal closure.


The authors are in the Department of Anatomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK, and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Post Office Box 19024, Seattle, WA 98109, USA. E-mail: paul.martin{at}ucl.ac.uk, susanp{at}fhcrc.org



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