Note to users. If you're seeing this message, it means that your browser cannot find this page's style/presentation instructions -- or possibly that you are using a browser that does not support current Web standards. Find out more about why this message is appearing, and what you can do to make your experience of our site the best it can be.

Subscribe

Sci. Signal., 27 July 2010
Vol. 3, Issue 132, p. ra55
[DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2000588]

RESEARCH ARTICLES

Editor's Summary

Self-Help Migration
Immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages migrate to sites of infection or inflammation by following gradients of chemoattractants. These include chemokines, which can be released by other cells at the target site; components of the complement system, such as C5a; and bacterial products, such as the formylated peptide, fMLP. While they navigate along the chemoattractant gradient toward their destination, cells are also exposed to other signals, some of which may compete with the chemoattractant that the cells were already following. Another level of complexity in the regulation of cell migration came from the discovery that migrating neutrophils release adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which then functions in an autocrine fashion through the purinergic receptor P2Y2 to enhance migration; cells deficient in P2Y2 have impaired gradient sensing. Kronlage et al. provide evidence that autocrine ATP signaling is also required for the migration of macrophages in vitro and in an in vivo model. The authors found that more than one type of ATP receptor type as well as metabolites of ATP contributed to the migratory responses of macrophages; furthermore, ATP was not released through pannexin-1 proteins, as has been suggested for neutrophils. Together, these data suggest that autocrine purinergic receptor signaling may play a general role in regulating the chemotactic responses of immune cells.

Citation: M. Kronlage, J. Song, L. Sorokin, K. Isfort, T. Schwerdtle, J. Leipziger, B. Robaye, P. B. Conley, H.-C. Kim, S. Sargin, P. Schön, A. Schwab, P. J. Hanley, Autocrine Purinergic Receptor Signaling Is Essential for Macrophage Chemotaxis. Sci. Signal. 3, ra55 (2010).

Read the Full Text


THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN CITED BY OTHER ARTICLES:
Pannexin 1 Channels Link Chemoattractant Receptor Signaling to Local Excitation and Global Inhibition Responses at the Front and Back of Polarized Neutrophils.
Y. Bao, Y. Chen, C. Ledderose, L. Li, and W. G. Junger (2013)
J. Biol. Chem. 288, 22650-22657
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Adenosine-A3 receptors in neutrophil microdomains promote the formation of bacteria-tethering cytonemes.
R. Corriden, T. Self, K. Akong-Moore, V. Nizet, B. Kellam, S. J. Briddon, and S. J. Hill (2013)
EMBO Rep. 14, 726-732
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Molecular Biology of Atherosclerosis.
P. N. Hopkins (2013)
Physiol Rev 93, 1317-1542
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Identification of a pharmacologically tractable Fra-1/ADORA2B axis promoting breast cancer metastasis.
C. J. Desmet, T. Gallenne, A. Prieur, F. Reyal, N. L. Visser, B. S. Wittner, M. A. Smit, T. R. Geiger, J. Laoukili, S. Iskit, et al. (2013)
PNAS 110, 5139-5144
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Cross-talk between skeletal muscle and immune cells: muscle-derived mediators and metabolic implications.
N. J. Pillon, P. J. Bilan, L. N. Fink, and A. Klip (2013)
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 304, E453-E465
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Ecto-Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase 7 Controls Th17 Cell Responses through Regulation of Luminal ATP in the Small Intestine.
T. Kusu, H. Kayama, M. Kinoshita, S. G. Jeon, Y. Ueda, Y. Goto, R. Okumura, H. Saiga, T. Kurakawa, K. Ikeda, et al. (2013)
J. Immunol. 190, 774-783
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Role of Ion Channels and Transporters in Cell Migration.
A. Schwab, A. Fabian, P. J. Hanley, and C. Stock (2012)
Physiol Rev 92, 1865-1913
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
ATP release and autocrine signaling through P2X4 receptors regulate {gamma}{delta} T cell activation.
M. Manohar, M. I. Hirsh, Y. Chen, T. Woehrle, A. A. Karande, and W. G. Junger (2012)
J. Leukoc. Biol. 92, 787-794
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Transient P2X7 Receptor Activation Triggers Macrophage Death Independent of Toll-like Receptors 2 and 4, Caspase-1, and Pannexin-1 Proteins.
P. J. Hanley, M. Kronlage, C. Kirschning, A. del Rey, F. Di Virgilio, J. Leipziger, I. P. Chessell, S. Sargin, M. A. Filippov, O. Lindemann, et al. (2012)
J. Biol. Chem. 287, 10650-10663
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Engrailed homeoprotein recruits the adenosine A1 receptor to potentiate ephrin A5 function in retinal growth cones.
O. Stettler, R. L. Joshi, A. Wizenmann, J. Reingruber, D. Holcman, C. Bouillot, F. Castagner, A. Prochiantz, and K. L. Moya (2012)
Development 139, 215-224
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Real-time Imaging Reveals That P2Y2 and P2Y12 Receptor Agonists Are Not Chemoattractants and Macrophage Chemotaxis to Complement C5a Is Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)- and p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-independent.
K. Isfort, F. Ebert, J. Bornhorst, S. Sargin, R. Kardakaris, M. Pasparakis, M. Bahler, T. Schwerdtle, A. Schwab, and P. J. Hanley (2011)
J. Biol. Chem. 286, 44776-44787
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Long-Term Dipeptidyl-Peptidase 4 Inhibition Reduces Atherosclerosis and Inflammation via Effects on Monocyte Recruitment and Chemotaxis.
Z. Shah, T. Kampfrath, J. A. Deiuliis, J. Zhong, C. Pineda, Z. Ying, X. Xu, B. Lu, S. Moffatt-Bruce, R. Durairaj, et al. (2011)
Circulation 124, 2338-2349
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection.
C. Seror, M.-T. Melki, F. Subra, S. Q. Raza, M. Bras, H. Saidi, R. Nardacci, L. Voisin, A. Paoletti, F. Law, et al. (2011)
J. Exp. Med. 208, 1823-1834
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Pannexin-1 Is Required for ATP Release during Apoptosis but Not for Inflammasome Activation.
Y. Qu, S. Misaghi, K. Newton, L. L. Gilmour, S. Louie, J. E. Cupp, G. R. Dubyak, D. Hackos, and V. M. Dixit (2011)
J. Immunol. 186, 6553-6561
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Activity-dependent targeting of TRPV1 with a pore-permeating capsaicin analog.
H. Li, S. Wang, A. Y. Chuang, B. E. Cohen, and H.-h. Chuang (2011)
PNAS 108, 8497-8502
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Deconstructing Tick Saliva: NON-PROTEIN MOLECULES WITH POTENT IMMUNOMODULATORY PROPERTIES.
C. J. F. Oliveira, A. Sa-Nunes, I. M. B. Francischetti, V. Carregaro, E. Anatriello, J. S. Silva, I. K. F. de Miranda Santos, J. M. C. Ribeiro, and B. R. Ferreira (2011)
J. Biol. Chem. 286, 10960-10969
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Bradykinin Promotes the Chemotactic Invasion of Primary Brain Tumors.
V. Montana and H. Sontheimer (2011)
J. Neurosci. 31, 4858-4867
   Abstract »    Full Text »    PDF »
Science Signaling Podcast: 4 January 2011.
M. B. Yaffe and A. M. VanHook (2011)
Science Signaling 4, pc1
   Abstract »    Full Text »

To Advertise     Find Products


Science Signaling. ISSN 1937-9145 (online), 1945-0877 (print). Pre-2008: Science's STKE. ISSN 1525-8882