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ST NetWatch: Awards and Announcements

Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award 2010 Winners View Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award 2010 Winners Save to My Folders
The 2010 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award honors Douglas Coleman and Jeffrey Friedman for their discovery of the hormone leptin. Leptin is primarily secreted by adipocytes and suppresses appetite by acting on the brain. This role in regulating appetite and body weight has made leptin a key molecule in obesity and diabetes research. The site includes an article describing the research that led to the award, a video about the awardees, the awardees’ acceptance remarks, video interviews, and an essay on the history of leptin research from each winner. General information about the Lasker Foundation and the award is also provided, plus access to pages about previous winners of the award, and photos from the awards ceremonies.
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Honorary Doctors at Karolinska Institutet 2010 View Honorary Doctors at Karolinska Institutet 2010 Save to My Folders
Each year, the Karolinska Institutet awards honorary doctorates to people who have made important contributions to the university. One of the 2010 honorees was Tony Pawson, whose work has advanced our understanding of the mechanisms of cell signaling. Research in Pawson's laboratory at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute at the University of Toronto focuses on the domains that mediate the protein-protein interactions that influence signal transduction.
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Honorary Doctors at Karolinska Institutet 2011 View Honorary Doctors at Karolinska Institutet 2011 Save to My Folders
Each year, the Karolinska Institutet awards honorary doctorates to people who have made important contributions to the university. One of the 2011 honorees was Katsuhiko Mikoshiba, a member of the Science Signaling Editorial Board and Board of Reviewing Editors. Mikoshiba was honored for his contributions to neurobiology, in particular the role of calcium signaling in regulating neuronal cell functions. Mikoshiba is a foreign adjunct professor at the Karolinska Institutet, and his laboratory is located at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Tokyo, Japan.
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Lasker Foundation Awards View Lasker Foundation Awards Save to My Folders
The Lasker Foundation honors outstanding contributions to clinical and basic medical research. Lasker Awards have recognized advances in understanding signaling pathways that affect health and disease such as the discovery of cAMP (Earl Sutherland, 1970), the first description of cell growth regulation (Rita Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen, 1986), and the characterization of the cell cycle machinery (Lee Hartwell, Yoshio Masui, and Paul Nurse, 1998). You may browse the awards year-by-year or search for a particular recipient’s name. In the “Learn More” section of the site, you will find audio and video interviews with laureates, medical fact sheets, and animated timelines of important advances in medical research. In the “For the Press” section, there are suggestions about research areas to watch for future medical advances and information for journalists who want to better understand topical medical research areas such as stem cell biology.
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Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award 2010 Winner View Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award 2010 Winner Save to My Folders
The Lasker-DeBakey Clincal Medical Research Award for 2010 honors Napoleone Ferrara for the discovery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and development of a treatment targeting VEGF for the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). VEGF is a soluble growth factor that stimulates blood vessel growth during embryogenesis and after injury. Ferrara studied the function of VEGF in animal models and developed ranibizumab, an antibody that binds to VEGF and slows the abnormal growth of blood vessels that leads to blindness in wet AMD in humans. The site includes an article describing the research that led to the award, a video about the awardee, the awardee’s acceptance speech, a video interview, and an essay by Ferrara. General information about the Lasker Foundation and the award is also provided, plus access to pages about previous winners of the award and photos from the awards ceremonies.
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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003 View The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003 Save to My Folders
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003 was awarded to Peter Agre, for discovering water channels, and to Roderick MacKinnon for structural and mechanistic studies of ion channels. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003 site at the Nobel e-Museum describes this research at both very basic and more advanced levels, and includes links to further information, an illustrated presentation, and animations of water channels in the cell membrane.
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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2004 View The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2004 Save to My Folders
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2004 was awarded to Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko, and Irwin Rose for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Going against the grain of prevalent research, Ciechanover, Hershko, and Rose discovered one of the cell's most important cyclical processes, regulated protein degradation. Specifically, the scientists' discovered a molecule called ubiquitin, which labels proteins for degradation by the proteasome. Targeted protein degradation is involved in many cellular processes, including the cell cycle, DNA repair, quality control of newly synthesized proteins, and many signaling pathways. Aberrant or dysfunctional protein degradation can contribute to human diseases, such as cervical cancer and cystic fibrosis, and the ubiquitin-mediated degradation pathway represents target for molecular invention and drug development. The Nobel Prize site provides an animation of the protein degradation process, audio files of interviews with the scientists, and the "Information for the Public" includes an overview with four figures of the ubiquitination cycle and disease relevance.
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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008 View The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008 Save to My Folders
Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Tsien were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008 for discovering green fluorescent protein (GFP) and developing it as a research tool. The use of GFP, which emits green light in response to stimulation with blue light, has revolutionized how researchers study protein localization, gene regulation, and cellular dynamics. This visible, nontoxic marker is widely used to tag proteins of interest, label cells, and monitor promoter activity. Shimomura first isolated GFP from jellyfish, Chalfie expressed GFP in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and Tsien developed variants of the protein that fluoresce in an array of colors. The combined work of these three researchers has profoundly changed the way that biologists can track cellular processes and behavior in live cells and intact organisms. This site includes interviews with the awardees plus video footage of the award ceremony.
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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2012 View The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2012 Save to My Folders
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2012 was awarded to Robert Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka for their research on G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Early work in Lefkowitz’s laboratory focused on developing methods for isolating and studying GPCRs. When Kobilka was a postdoctoral fellow in Lefkowitz’s laboratory, he played a key role in the cloning of the first gene encoding a β-adrenergic receptor. Lefkowitz’s group subsequently cloned the genes encoding many other adrenergic receptors and has continued to study the mechanisms of GPCR activation, regulation, and downstream signaling. Kobilka’s research has focused on structural and mechanistic studies of GPCRs, including crystal structures of active GPCRs and an active GPCR ternary complex. The work from these scientists has led to a greater understanding of the relationship between receptor structure and function and has informed the development of pharmacological agents targeting GPCRs. This site includes interviews with the awardees, biographical sketches, a detailed description of the research that led to the award, and video lectures from Lefkowitz on seven-transmembrane receptors and β-arrestins. Video footage of the award ceremony, acceptance speeches, and lectures will be posted following the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony and Nobel Lectures in December 2012.
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The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1998 View The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1998 Save to My Folders
The discovery that the elusive "endothelial relaxing factor"--a substance released from endothelium to cause dilation of blood vessels--was a short-lived gas, nitric oxide (NO), inaugurated a new concept of gases as signaling molecules. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1998 site at the Nobel e-Museum describes the research of Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro, and Ferid Murad that led to this discovery and includes PDFs of the Nobel Lectures of the three laureates, autobiographies, an illustrated presentation and an educational video presentation featuring Ferid Murad.
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The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2000 View The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2000 Save to My Folders
The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2000 was awarded to Arvid Carlsson, Paul Greengard, and Eric Kandel "for their discoveries concerning signal transduction in the nervous system". The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2000 site at the Nobel e-Museum describes Carlsson's work identifying dopamine as a neurotransmitter, Greengard's work implicating phosphorylation as a mechanism of dopamine action, and Kandel's work on the cellular and molecular bases of memory in Aplysia. The site includes autobiographies of the three laureates, videos and PDFs of their Nobel Lectures, a very basic illustrated presentation of their research, and a "Lost Synapse" game, in which synaptic physiology is explored in the context of alien abduction.
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The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2001 View The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2001 Save to My Folders
In addition to describing the research of Leland Hartwell, Tim Hunt, and Paul Nurse on the regulation of the cell cycle, The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2001 site at the Nobel e-Museum includes such features as videos of their Nobel Lectures, autobiographies, and even a "Control of the Cell Cycle" game.
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The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2004 View The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2004 Save to My Folders
The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2004 was awarded to Richard Axel and Linda B. Buck for their discoveries of odorant receptors and the organization of the olfactory system. The two scientists discovered a large gene family consisting of about 1,000 different genes that specify an equivalent number of olfactory receptor types and determined how information from cells bearing individual receptors was organized in the olfactory bulb of the brain to give rise to distinctive odors. Watch a 2001 Nobel Symposia lecture given by Buck, follow links to video of a lecture by Axel, and listen to telephone interviews with both scientists.
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The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2011 View The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2011 Save to My Folders
The Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 2011 was awarded to Bruce Beutler, Jules Hoffmann, and Ralph Steinman for seminal contributions to our understanding of innate and adaptive immunity. Work from Beutler and Hoffmann elucidated the mechanism by which the innate immune system senses and responds to the presence of pathogens. Hoffmann discovered that the Toll receptor in fruit flies was required for the innate immune system to sense the presence of pathogenic bacteria or fungi and mount a response. Beutler subsequently found that a Toll-like receptor (TLR) was required for mammals to detect and respond to the toxic bacterial component lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which can cause septic shock. Steinman contributed to our understanding of mammalian adaptive immunity by providing the first description of dendritic cells and determining that these cells activate pathogen-fighting T cells while preventing activation of T cells that might attack the body’s own cells. This site includes interviews with the awardees, a detailed description of the research that led to the award, and video footage of the award ceremony and acceptance speech.
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World Cell Race View World Cell Race Save to My Folders
Have you ever wondered how migratory cells stack up against one another when it comes to speed? The World Cell Race was a competition to determine which cells migrated the fastest on a fibronectin-coated track. Laboratories sent samples of their entries to six imaging centers that carried out the races and determined the results. The winner, announced at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting in Denver in December 2011, was a bone marrow stem cell line submitted by a laboratory from the National University of Singapore. A description of the protocols for testing each entry and the methods for measuring cell speed are outlined on the site.
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