Perspective

Glioblastomas on the Move

Science's STKE  20 Apr 2004:
Vol. 2004, Issue 229, pp. pe18
DOI: 10.1126/stke.2292004pe18

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Abstract

The mechanism by which the tumor suppressor PTEN slows tumor cell migration is not well characterized. A recent study by Raftopoulou et al. shows that a lack of PTEN protein phosphatase activity accelerates the migration of glioblastoma cells. The protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is directly or indirectly responsible for dephosphorylating a PTEN residue, threonine-383, which is necessary for slowing cell migration. These findings have implications for the design of new therapies against glioblastomas and other highly invasive cancers.

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