Contents

04 December 2007
Vol 2007, Issue 415
  • Contents

    • Editorial Guide

    • Perspectives

    • Editors' Choice

      • Two’s Company, Three’s a Complex

        Ribosomal protein S3 is an essential subunit of NF-κB complexes that confers selectivity toward target genes.

      • Looking After Polysialic Acid

        The maturation of GABAergic inhibition--and thereby the onset of ocular dominance plasticity--is regulated by an activity-dependent decrease in polysialic acid.

      • Losing RGS2 and a Taste for GHB

        RGS2 decreases coupling between GABAB receptors and GIRK channels, thereby influencing the bidirectional effects of GABAB agonists on activity of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons.

      • Delivering AMPA Receptors to the Synapse

        cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates GluR1-type glutamate receptor subunits and increases their abundance at the cell surface.

      • Old Enough to Remember?

        Requirements of LTP signaling vary in the developing brain.

      • Antibiotics Target Akt

        Targeting host kinases, such as Akt1, may be an effective strategy to control bacterial infection.

      • Sensing the End

        A pathogen-sensing protein of the innate immune system recognizes the 5′-triphosphate structures of single-stranded RNA present in many bacteria and viruses.

      • Die Another Way

        The invasion of one epithelial cell by another provides a nonapoptotic mechanism of cell death, entosis, which is dependent on adherens junction formation.

      • Tacking Myelin Seams

        A protein that forms particularly tight junctions between intestinal or endothelial cells also seals the ends of the myelin wrapping around nerve axons.

About The Cover

Cover image expansion

COVER This week's Focus Issue highlights the nucleus (see the Editorial Guide [http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/sigtrans;2007/415/eg11]). Articles and resources at STKE focus on signaling within the nucleus, as well as transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The image depicts an artist's rendition of a cell nucleus. [Image: Christopher Bickel , AAAS]