PodcastDevelopmental Biology

Science Signaling Podcast: 12 November 2013

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Sci. Signal.  12 Nov 2013:
Vol. 6, Issue 301, pp. pc30
DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2004837

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Abstract

This Podcast features an interview with Stephen Rogers and Mark Peifer, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 12 November 2013 issue of Science Signaling, about their identification of a receptor for a factor that drives gastrulation in fruit fly embryos. Most animal embryos are composed of three basic cell types: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. These three germ layers are created by gastrulation, a morphogenetic process by which cells of the early embryo are rearranged into a three-layered structure. Gastrulation is absolutely essential for proper development and is primarily driven by cell shape changes. Fruit fly embryos have been used as a model for studying gastrulation for decades due to their rapid development, the ease of viewing gastrulation in vivo, and the availability of mutants with defective gastrulation. Using an in vitro assay that recapitulates the cell shape changes that occur during gastrulation, Stephen Rogers and Mark Peifer have identified the G protein–coupled receptor Mist as the receptor for Fog, a secreted factor that drives gastrulation in the fruit fly.

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