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Perspectives

Christelle Forcet and Marc Billaud
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: pe51.
LKB1 appears to be a novel class of tumor suppressor that acts as an energy-sensing and polarity checkpoint. Abstract »   Full Text »   PDF »  
Yunchao Su, Dmitry Kondrikov, and Edward R. Block
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: pe52.
beta-actin regulates the activity of NOS-3 directly and indirectly through Hsp90. Abstract »   Full Text »   PDF »  

 

Editors' Choice

John F. Foley
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: tw334.
Myeloid-related proteins 8 and 14 enhance responses of Toll-like receptor 4 to lipopolysaccharide and promote death. Abstract »  
Stephen J. Simpson
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: tw335.
An innate immune receptor in humans selectively protects against severe infection of the central nervous system by herpes simplex virus 1. Abstract »  
L. Bryan Ray
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: tw336.
Neutrophils put receptors borrowed from platelets to good use. Abstract »  
Elizabeth M. Adler
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: tw337.
Glucose sensing by hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons is implicated in systemic glucose homeostasis and lost in obese mice fed a high-fat diet. Abstract »  
Elizabeth M. Adler
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: tw338.
The microRNAs miR-15 and miR-16 link asymmetry in Wnt/beta-catenin to asymmetry in Nodal signaling and thereby play a crucial role in regulating embryonic patterning. Abstract »  
Nancy R. Gough
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: tw339.
Organized epithelial structures resist transformation through a mechanism involving LKB1. Abstract »  
Valda J. Vinson
Sci. STKE 18 September 2007: tw340.
The structure of a 450-million-year-old corticoid receptor, resurrected computationally and biochemically, suggests how modern hormone receptors evolved. Abstract »  
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Science Signaling. ISSN 1937-9145 (online), 1945-0877 (print). Pre-2008: Science's STKE. ISSN 1525-8882