Research ArticleCell Biology

Apoptotic Cells Activate the “Phoenix Rising” Pathway to Promote Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science Signaling  23 Feb 2010:
Vol. 3, Issue 110, pp. ra13
DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2000634

You are currently viewing the editor's summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Rising from the Dead

Tissue injury causes cell death. Apoptotic cell death enables the elimination of damaged cells, clearing the way for tissue regeneration. Enzymes called caspases are activated in apoptotic cells, and Li et al. show that in addition to helping to execute the death process, caspases 3 and 7 stimulate the release of proliferation signals from dying cells. The authors found that skin wound healing and liver regeneration were compromised in mice deficient in caspase 3 or 7. Furthermore, stem or progenitor cells injected with or without irradiated cells or injected into irradiated or undamaged tissue proliferated more in the presence of irradiated cells or tissue. The authors dub the molecular events associated with death-induced proliferation the “phoenix rising” pathway, which involves the caspase-mediated activation of phospholipase A2 and the subsequent production and release of the lipid signal prostaglandin E2, a stimulator of cell proliferation.

View Full Text