Research ResourceTechniques

Engineering the ABA Plant Stress Pathway for Regulation of Induced Proximity

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science Signaling  15 Mar 2011:
Vol. 4, Issue 164, pp. rs2
DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2001449

You are currently viewing the editor's summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Inducible Regulation with ABA

Several systems exist to inducibly alter cellular behavior; however, they each have limitations. Turning to plants, Liang et al. determined that they could engineer systems with two protein components of the plant abscisic acid (ABA) pathway to create a chemically induced proximity system that responded to exogenously applied ABA (see the associated Perspective by Cutler). They demonstrated the ability of this ABA-induced proximity system to stimulate gene expression and control protein subcellular localization and activation of a signaling cascade in mammalian cells; furthermore, they showed that the ABA system could be combined with other induced proximity systems to control multiple proteins simultaneously. Studies with mice suggested that ABA was orally available and had a half-life suitable for analysis of biologic pathways. These characteristics of ABA, combined with its lack of toxicity, may make this system useful for applications in humans.

View Full Text